How to File for Divorce in Colorado

Bloch & Chapleau Sep 7th, 2017 Family Law

If you are considering getting a divorce, you are not alone. According to the National Center for Health Care Statistics, more than 800,000 American couples file for divorce every year. Even though it is often the right decision, divorce is stressful is for anyone who has to go through it. Not only do you have to deal with the intense, raw emotions, but you also need to ensure that the process is done correctly, so that your parental rights and financial interests are fully protected. In this post, our top-rated Denver divorce lawyers explain the basics of how to file for divorce in Colorado.

How to File for Divorce in Colorado

The Requirements to Get a Divorce in Colorado

Grounds for Divorce

Colorado is a ‘no fault’ divorce state. To obtain a divorce, the only thing that you will need to prove is that your marriage is irretrievably broken. Neither spouse needs to prove that the other actually did anything wrong within the course of their relationship. If you are a Colorado resident and you wish to end your marriage, you have the legal ability to do so.

Residency Requirements

To get a divorce in Colorado, you and your spouse must meet the state’s basic residency requirements. While this requirement is not a big hurdle for many couples, it will come into play in some cases. To be more specific, Colorado requires that at least one spouse must have resided in the state for at least 90 consecutive days. To be clear, you do not have to have been married in Colorado to get a divorce in the state.

Preparing and Filing the Forms With the Court

You will need to prepare divorce forms, and then file these documents with the appropriate court. This can be challenging, especially if you have a more complex divorce case. Put simply, if your divorce involves minor children or a considerable amount of marital assets, it is imperative that you prepare your divorce forms with the assistance of a qualified attorney. You need to ensure that your parental rights and your right to your property are protected.

Service of Divorce Papers

Finally, you will need to serve divorce papers on your spouse. In most cases, this is not a problem. Though, in some cases, a particularly uncooperative spouse may try to make serving divorce papers on them extremely challenging. If this is an issue for you, you should speak to an attorney about the best way to serve divorce papers in your specific situation.

Protect Your Rights: Work With a Denver Divorce Attorney

At Bloch & Chapleau, LLC, our firm is committed to helping our clients get fair treatment in Colorado divorce cases. To find out more about what we can do for you, please contact our team today for immediate legal assistance. We have offices in Denver, Park Meadows and the Vail Valley, and serve clients throughout the region, including in Jefferson County and Park County.